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Welcome to the Instagram blog! See how Instagrammers are capturing and sharing the world's moments through photo and video features, user spotlights, tips and news from Instagram HQ.

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Photography, Art, Crafts, sculpture, robots, typewriter, technology, User Feature, In the Artist's Studio, Instagram,

The Art of Typewriter Sculpture with @jeremymayer

To see more photos and videos of Jeremy’s typewriter sculptures, follow @jeremymayer on Instagram.

Inside his studio in Oakland, California, artist Jeremy Mayer (@jeremymayer) transforms typewriters into majestic mythological beings. His most recent completed commission is a sculpture of the Greek titaness Theia that is over 7 feet tall (2.21 meters) and made entirely of components from 40 different typewriters. “I don’t solder, glue, weld or wire the parts together,” says Jeremy. “I use only screws, nuts, pins and springs to assemble the sculpture in the same manner that the typewriter was held together.”

The painstakingly detailed process to create a full-scale human figure requires more than a year of Jeremy’s time. “I spend countless hours trying to figure out how to put this stuff together,” he says. “Doing an accurate likeness of a person hurts my brain. Hurts so good, though. There’s a lot of trial and error. I’m done when it creeps me out, or if I walk into the studio and the sculpture startles me because it looks like someone is standing there.”

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Photography, Art, Crafts, Artists on Tumblr, User Feature, Tokyo, Japan, felt doll, Instagram,

Inside @fujitasanpuru’s Tiny World of Chimchiminey, the Chimney Sweep

For more photos and videos of Chimchiminey and its friends, follow @fujitasanpuru on Instagram.

“The concept of my work is a dreamy, cute world that people might believe could exist somewhere,” says a Tokyo doll maker who goes by the pseudonym Fujita Sanpuru (@fujitasanpuru). Through his photos, he tells the story of the chimney sweep Chimchiminey and his devoted helper Heso-guma (“belly button bear”).

Fujita Sanpuru uses felt and embroidery threads to create these pint-sized figurines, focusing on bringing the right balance of detail and simplicity to the handicraft. He then arranges the characters on table tops, in gardens or in their small and colorful dollhouses to create scenes like the pages from a children’s picture book.

The tiny felted figures actually originated when he first started using Instagram and made a prop for his first photo. Soon after sharing the Chimchiminey series, he began receiving numerous offers to sell and display his work. He reflects on his experience, “I never thought the dolls would take off like this when I started Instagram, but I’m just happy if people find them delightful.”

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photography, art, design, letterpress, vintage, typography, robots, user feature, illustration, instagram,

Exploring the Creative Limits of Letterpress with @churchoftype

On this day in 1452, Johann Gutenberg printed the very first book using a printing press with movable type. More than 550 years later, Gutenberg’s invention continues to unlock creative expression. To see more unconventional letterpress creations from Kevin Bradley, follow @churchoftype on Instagram.

Kevin Bradley (@churchoftype) has spent the past 21 years pushing letterpress to its creative limits. “It wants to be art,” Kevin says of his chosen medium, which he gravitated towards in school because he saw it as a middle ground between graphic design and fine art. Evolution, he explains, is part of his process. “I’ve tortured the space of 18”x24” in every imaginable way over the years, and moving up in size has been the key to revitalizing the entire experience.”

Kevin recently moved to Santa Monica, California, uprooting himself after nearly two decades in Knoxville, Tennessee. The change of scenery brought with it much needed creative inspiration. “There’s a lot going on here,” he says. “I’m discovering a whole community. I definitely feel as though I’m a new animal here.”

His recent works reshape the familiar forms of typography into pictures. “I approach these more as paintings than prints,” he says. “Each is one of a kind.” By constructing images from type, explains Kevin, “I am able to create layers of information that contribute to an overall narrative.”

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photography, hashtag highlight, realraysfordays, instagram,

Chasing #realraysfordays with @maurensparrow

For more perfectly captured rays of light, follow @maurensparrow on Instagram and browse the #realraysfordays hashtag.

Little Rock Instagrammer Mauren Sparrow Kennedy (@maurensparrow) is the creative brain behind #realraysfordays. Though sunbeams are commonly enhanced in digital post-processing, Mauren spends her time both photographing and curating photographs that feature “the most beautiful, interesting, unique—and totally real—sunrays that Instagrammers could catch on their phones.” Looking at the ever-growing gallery, Mauren is excited by how the community has picked up #realraysfordays. To help create more light chasing images, she shares her top tips for capturing sunrays:

  1. Always be on the lookout. “The sun behind certain clouds or the way it can shine through the trees gives you completely natural, absolutely real rays that are incredible.”
  2. Be aware of your light source and the objects around it. “Shooting directly into the light with your light source slightly obscured by either a thing or person will give you some awesome sun glare.”
  3. Practice. “Once you figure out how to shoot the rays you like, shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot! See what shot works best for showing off the awesome rays you’re trying to capture. Shoot from different angles and with different exposures to make sure you’re getting your rays in the best light possible (pun intended).”

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WHPteatime, weekend hashtag project, tea, food, design, Photography, Instagram,

Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPteatime

Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes and hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.

This weekend’s prompt was #WHPteatime, which asked participants to capture beautiful photos and videos about tea. Every Monday we feature some of our favorite submissions from the project, but be sure to check out the rest here.

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Instagram, cartoon, lion king, despicable me, france, User Feature, Photography,

Cartoon Characters Brought to Life with @francoisdourlen

For more childlike plays on the world around him, follow @francoisdourlen on Instagram.

“It’s not a question of the camera lens, just a question of the moment, imagination and expression,” says Instagrammer François Dourlen (@francoisdourlen), a teacher from Normandy, France. Inspired by the daily scenes around him, François is reminded of characters from popular culture and animation films. “I don’t really choose photos to put with the background,” he explains. “The background makes me think about pictures I’ve seen.”

His playful style inserts cartoon characters on real life backgrounds to delight his followers—and himself. He adds: “My message to the world is: ‘Do not forget to look at the world through a child’s eyes.’”

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photography, instalation, happiness, color, instagram,

Spotting Cotton Candy Colors with @aurelycerise

For an extra dose of cotton candy-color, follow @aurelycerise on Instagram.

Aurely Cerise (@aurelycerise ) chases rainbows of color, and she describes her photography as “fresh” and smile-inducing. “My friends say my art brings happiness,” says the Paris Instagrammer. With color being her creative trigger, Aurely looks at everyday objects and naturally starts composing still life scenes. Whether it’s masking tape, pencils or a cup of coffee, Aurely enjoys arranging random things and capturing them from particular perspectives. “It’s funny to see how many things could be really beautiful when you only change your point of view,” she says. Organizing also helps to overcome her natural anxiety. “When I create a set-up it allows me to channel my stress.”

When Aurely is not out and about capturing colorful sceneries, she lets her creative juices flow in front of a canvas. “This photo explains how i imagine creation. Nothing is planned, the feelings are getting out from my brush and start creating forms.” Her simple advice for finding joy: “Put some color in your life.”

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Photography, underwater, the week on instagram, world, pirate, dog, Fashion, Instagram,

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Instagram, User Feature, Photography, symmetry, russia,

The Dynamic Life through the Symmetry Perspective

To see more photos of heroes in Sasha’s symmetrical world, follow sashalevin on Instagram.

Moscow Instagrammer Sasha Levin (@sashalevin) is always on the lookout for heroes in the landscapes and spaces around him. What turns an ordinary person into a hero? For Sasha, the answer is unexpected: symmetry. “The symmetry of a shot is an empty canvas for my creativity—I try to highlight a perfect symmetrical angle through the people in the composition,” he explains. “My eyes always spot people in the background. It‘s allowed me to show dynamic life in a static frame.” Sasha’s photography focuses on the intimate relationship between people and the space they occupy. “If somebody were ask me, ‘Where is beauty in the world?’” he explains, “I would answer that it is in symmetry.”

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Photography, Art, street art, graffiti, latin america, mexico city, Location Feature, User Feature,

Treasure Hunting in Mexico City with @lanzgg

For more photos of Jacinta’s street treasures, follow @lanzgg on Instagram.

“This city is a place full of life, loud noises and big smiles. It is saturated with colors and flavors,” explains Mexico City Instagrammer Jacinta Lanz (@lanzgg). Though Jacinta is originally from Dayton, Ohio, she moved to Mexico City as a young child and has found artistic inspiration in her adopted country ever since. “I’m on the lookout for color, decay and people. When I find all of those things together, I feel like I’ve won the lottery. Places that look forgotten, old, dirty or even ugly often become treasures for me. I find something extraordinary, in the everyday ordinary.”