Instagram

Get the free app for iOS, Android, or Windows Phone

Welcome to the Instagram blog! See how Instagrammers are capturing and sharing the world's moments through photo and video features, user spotlights, tips and news from Instagram HQ.

Photoset

Photography, instameet, london, polaroid, instant film, vintage, impossible project, ImpossibleProjectMeet, Photographer's Gallery, ImpossibleColour, Instagram,

Celebrating 175 Years of Photography in All Its Forms

To view more photos and videos from the Impossible Project InstaMeet, browse the #ImpossibleProjectMeet and #ImpossibleColour hashtags and follow @tomskipp, @impossible_hq and @thephotographersgallery on Instagram.

On August 19, 175 years ago, Frenchman Louis Daguerre announced he had created the first permanent photographic process.

The same year, British inventor Sir Henry Fox Talbot unveiled a series of photographs made using the calotype process years earlier, famously capturing the first photographic negative of the latticed window at Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, England. The daguerreotype and calotype processes went on to create the type of photos we take today.

This weekend, a group of Instagrammers celebrated the anniversary by exploring the overlap between old and new forms of photography in a daylong workshop at The Photographers’ Gallery (@thephotographersgallery) in London. Armed with vintage instant film cameras and Impossible Project (@impossible_hq) film, the group took photos with both smartphone and analog film on a photowalk around Soho before decamping to experiment with techniques in printing their Instagram photos using instant film.

“People enjoy seeing an image being created right in front of their eyes, so there’s a natural synergy between Instagram and instant film,” says InstaMeet organiser Tom Skipp (@tomskipp). “It was great to be able to share these moments with people that are so passionate. Seeing and sharing an image developing is a beautiful thing, like the original Instagram!”

Photoset

photography, music, vintage, history, Elvis, Elvis Week, Graceland, User Feature, current events, Instagram,

Paying Tribute to “The King” During Elvis Week

To see more moments from the life of an Elvis tribute artist, follow @deanzaselvis on Instagram. To watch Elvis Week events as they unfold, explore the Graceland location page.

“I like to say that my job description is singing the greatest music ever created and making people happy in the process,” says Elvis tribute artist Dean Zeligman (@deanzaselvis), who makes his living performing as Elvis across the globe. This time last year, Dean beat out more than 500 other artists to take top honors at Graceland’s (@visitgraceland), Elvis Week competition.

There’s more to being an Elvis tribute artist than one might expect. “We must make the unnatural natural,” explains Dean. “His movements and mannerisms must be as natural to us as our own. I studied theatrical makeup to match his facial features, recreated all of his stage wear and even his casual clothes. Nothing is done half-heartedly.”

Photoset

photography, cameras, vintage, Instagram, User Feature, hashtag highlight, medium format,

Looking through #viewfindersofthepast with @littlecoal

For more perspective-bending photos from vintage camera owners around the world, browse the #viewfindersofthepast hashtag. To see more of Eric’s life in Ohio through the lens of his Bosley, follow @littlecoal on Instagram.

When Ohio schoolteacher and Instagrammer Eric Ward (@littlecoal) received an old film camera that had belonged to his wife’s grandfather, the connection was instantaneous. “I immediately fell in love with the glass and the unique feel you get looking down through a viewfinder of that age,” he says. “I imagined all that he had seen through the same viewfinder and wanted to find a way to continue what he had started.”

Eric continues that story on Instagram with his camera, a Bolsey Model C Twin Lens Reflex from the 1950s with a top-down viewfinder. By taking a photo from above with his phone, Eric discovered he could capture two subjects at once: the camera itself and what the camera “sees” through its lens. “For me, it connected the camera’s past with today’s reality,” he says.

He started the #viewfindersofthepast hashtag to keep track of the photos he was taking, and over time it took off in the community. “Others have started to add photos from a variety of other film cameras,” he says, “which I think is perfect!”

Photoset

art, vintage, crafts, user feature, paper cutouts, Jorge Miranda, Instagram,

The Lives of @yorch_miranda’s Paper Cutouts

To see more scenes from Jorge’s creative mind, follow @yorch_miranda on Instagram.

For Miami filmmaker Jorge Miranda (@yorch_miranda), working with miniature paper dolls provides a refreshing flexibility. “These photos have become for me a faster way to express my ideas with actors that don’t complain and don’t need to get paid,” he says.

"Using objects that we interact with in our daily lives makes it easy for people to understand and relate no matter where they come from," says Jorge, whose whimsical portraits draw inspiration from his film work and creative Instagram communities like @graphic_arts_bnw. “I hope people realize how easy is to have fun with items we see every day.”

Photoset

art, vintage, portrait, user feature, Sandro Giordano, instagram,

The Whimsically Macabre Scenes of @__remmidemmi

To see more of Sandro’s explorations of “bodies with no regret,” follow @__remmidemmi on Instagram.

In his macabre, tragicomic photo series, Italian photographer Sandro Giordoan (@__remmidemmi) explores the willingness of people to put the safety of material objects before their own well-being.

When conceiving the project, _IN EXTREMIS (bodies with no regret), Sandro drew from personal experience. “Last summer I had a small but tough bicycle accident,” he explains. “I lost 30% of my right hand’s functions because I never let go of the object I was holding as I fell.”

When, shortly after, a friend broke his leg to prevent his smartphone from falling in water, Sandro became concerned. “We live in a time where we risk material things becoming more important than our own lives, and this is really worrying.”

Sandro channeled his concern into crafting meticulous and whimsical photos. “I immediately felt the urgency to capture the moment of impact. I wanted to talk about obsessions, neurosis and frailties of our times through my personal experience.” The resulting photos are at once humorous and haunting.

Many think that the wildly contorted bodies in Sandro’s photos are dolls or dummies. Not so, says Sandro. “I work exclusively with professional actors who are able to position themselves in anatomically impossible poses because they are trained to use their bodies to communicate.”