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Welcome to the Instagram blog! See how Instagrammers are capturing and sharing the world's moments through photo and video features, user spotlights, tips and news from Instagram HQ.

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Photography, portraits, self portrait, fairy tale, alice in wonderland, latin america, venezuela, User Feature, Instagram,

@belilabelle in Wonderland

To see more of Belinda’s surreal scenes, follow @belilabelle on Instagram.

Venezuela Instagrammer Belinda Tellez (@belilabelle) has always had a passion for surreal tales. “As a kid I was kind of weird. I liked books more than dolls and used to memorize passages from ‘Alice in Wonderland,’” she says. These days Belinda writes her own stories through surreal photography, often starring as the main character of imaginative scenes. She views each image as a story or anecdote, which reveal her secrets. “When the pictures become very surreal and imaginative, they also ironically become incredibly real.” Belinda’s creations are often the work of a one-woman show: “I take the self-portraits myself, so when the result is similar to what I imagined, I dance.”

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Photography, travel, travel photography, latin america, chile, santiago, Local Lens, Instagram,

Local Lens: Collecting Everyday Scenes in Chile

To see more of Chile through the lens of a local, follow @valentinagreene on Instagram.

Valentina Greene (@valentinagreene) is always going beyond the surface when she’s photographing a scene. “I enjoy looking beyond the things people usually see—like backyards or barns,” she says. “Behind facades and behind the scenes for the real deal. It’s my way of trying to get to know people and their stories.” Among Valentina’s favorite local places in Chile are the tiny towns near Lago Vichuquen. She says, “I am inspired by traces or clues that reflect people’s daily lives. Things that seem unimportant are precious to me.” Valentina also loves photographing the beach in Maitencillo, “I like its minimal scenario.” In her hometown of Santiago, Valentina recommends La Vega, a street market “full of color, noise, smells, dogs and the best characters.”

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music, Photography, clarinet, album cover, mar del plata, argentina, latin america, User Feature, Instagram,

The Sound of Silence with @mentaylunares

For more images of Paula’s photographic soundtrack, follow @mentaylunares on Instagram.

Clarinetist Paula Amenta (@mentaylunares) from Mar del Plata, Argentina has always enjoyed capturing silence, in both her music and her photographs. “My favorite moment at concerts is the silence before the music begins,” she says. “I love the anticipation and the quietness which suggests so many things.”

Paula is also inspired by album covers. “They are as important as the music they contain,” she says. “My boyfriend is a musician and is recording an album, so I’m always shooting photographs which could become album covers.”

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Photography, Art, street art, graffiti, latin america, mexico city, Location Feature, User Feature,

Treasure Hunting in Mexico City with @lanzgg

For more photos of Jacinta’s street treasures, follow @lanzgg on Instagram.

“This city is a place full of life, loud noises and big smiles. It is saturated with colors and flavors,” explains Mexico City Instagrammer Jacinta Lanz (@lanzgg). Though Jacinta is originally from Dayton, Ohio, she moved to Mexico City as a young child and has found artistic inspiration in her adopted country ever since. “I’m on the lookout for color, decay and people. When I find all of those things together, I feel like I’ve won the lottery. Places that look forgotten, old, dirty or even ugly often become treasures for me. I find something extraordinary, in the everyday ordinary.”

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art, illustration, mexico, dance, teen, latin america, User Feature, Instagram,

Drawing on Emotion with @literaluis

For more of Luis’s sketches, follow @literaluis on Instagram.

"I’ve been doodling since I can remember. At times, it even becomes a totally unconscious act. No blank sheet of paper is safe with me as long as there’s a pen or pencil around,” says 17-year-old Mexico sketch artist and dancer Luis Ruiz (@literaluis). Luis characterizes his style as cartoon-like and says he never intends for his characters to really resemble the subject. “The relevance I see in them doesn’t lie in who they are, but what they would say if they were able to speak,” he explains.

Luis finds creative inspiration from listening to others. “My favorite things to sketch are portraits because of how much they reveal about a being or a person: a nostalgic gaze, lips sealed as if they had something important to say, even the way hair is styled. The possibilities are endless.” Relating to his subjects is also a part of Luis’s creative process. He explains, “I enjoy seeing the contrast between my characters’ portraits and my own. By standing next to them, I am reminded that they are a part of me and that their feelings were once my own. Nowadays everyone is eager to share their own story, however only a few are keen to listen. Listening to someone else makes you realize how human we all truly are and how our emotions aren’t as alienated as we may portray them.”

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Location Feature, chile, water cave, latin america, kayak,

Up close inside Chile’s watery Marble Cathedral

To see more photos and videos from Marble Cathedral, browse the #catedralesdemarmol hashtag and explore the Lago General Carrera location page.

Instagrammers from around the world trek to Catedral de Marmol, or the “Marble Cathedral,” on Chile’s General Lake Carrera to photograph the dazzling series of water-filled caves and tunnels. The unique rock structures were formed by over 6,000 years of waves crashing against the Patagonian Andes, and geologists attribute the water’s intense blue to the presence of finely ground glacial silt. The Marble Cathedral can be explored by boat or kayak, allowing adventurers to get an up-close look.

Though beautiful, the Catedrales de Marmol are not easy to reach. Adventurers must fly 1287 kilometers (800 miles) from Santiago to the city of Coyhaique, and brave an additional 322 kilometers (200 miles) of dirt roads to reach General Lake Carrera.