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Welcome to the Instagram blog! See how Instagrammers are capturing and sharing the world's moments through photo and video features, user spotlights, tips and news from Instagram HQ.

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photography, travel photography, travel, michael matti, landscape, hiking, seattle, waterfall, user feature, instagram,

A Hiker’s Ever-Changing View from the Tent with @michaelmatti

For more from Michael’s adventures in the Pacific North and beyond, follow @michaelmatti on Instagram.

Even though his photography has taken him around the world, Michael Matti (@michaelmatti)’s heart—and Instagram feed—belong to beautiful landscapes near his home in Seattle.

“The amazing outdoors scene in the Pacific Northwest inspired me after college,” he says. “There is so much to see with its sea-stack-filled beaches, rugged mountains and cascading waterfalls.”

Michael frequently frames nature shots through tents, a technique he says is common among his peers. He also includes a human or animal figure against every backdrop—no matter how small they appear in the image.

“People give scale to nature,” he says. “A waterfall shot with a tiny person in the frame helps to really add a sense of wonder to the falls.”

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Location Feature, huashan, china, 华山, hiking,

Climbing Huashan (华山), China’s Most Heart-stopping Hike

For more photos from the hike to the top, explore the 华山 Mount Huashan location page and browse the #huashan and #华山 hashtags.

In China’s Shaanxi province, 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Xi’an, the peaks of Mount Hua, or Huashan (华山), pierce the clouds, tempting adventurers to explore their heights.

The westernmost of China’s legendary Five Great Mountains, Huashan has stood as a destination for Daoist and Buddhist pilgramage for centuries—though the inaccessability of its peaks attracts only the most dedicated of pilgrims.

The southern peak reaches the highest altitude at 2,155 meters (7,070 feet), igniting the imaginations of thrill-seeking travellers. Home to an ancient monastery that in recent years has been converted into a tea house, the trail to the peak is one of the most dangerous in the world. Those brave enough to make the climb face steep and winding staircases carved into the cliffs and Huashan’s notorious plank road: a series of wooden planks affixed to the mountain’s face with no rails or barracades between hikers and the abyss below.