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Welcome to the Instagram blog! See how Instagrammers are capturing and sharing the world's moments through photo and video features, user spotlights, tips and news from Instagram HQ.

Photoset

art thursday, Location Feature, spain, sevilla, metropol parasol,

Finding Shade Under Sevilla’s Metropol Parasol

To view more photos of the Metropol Parsol, explore the Metropol Parasol location page and browse the #metropolparasol hashtag.

The Metropol Parasol provides a modern aesthetic against the medieval backdrop of Sevilla, Spain’s old quarter. Arguably the world’s largest wooden structure, it towers 28.5 meters (93.5 feet) over La Plaza de la Encarnación. Inside, one can visit a farmer’s market, archaeological museum, bars, restaurants and an elevated plaza providing beautiful panoramic views of the city. Most importantly, the stunning structure of interlaced panels (supported by concrete and steel) provides the people in the sweltering capitol of Andalucía with a precious resource: 5,000 square meters (53,819 square feet) of shade.

Completed in 2011, no two parts of the Metropol Parasol are the same. It stirs conversation among residents and tourists alike, and is described differently by nearly every person who sees it. Whether one compares German architect Jürgen Mayer-Hermann’s intricate design to waffles or mushrooms (one popular local nickname for the structure is Las Setas de la Encarnación or “The mushrooms of La Plaza de la Encarnción”) many appreciate the six connected parasols that replaced what was previously a car park.

Another fun fact? The structure in the center of hot and sticky Andalucía also claims an additional record—as the world’s largest structure held together by glue.

Photoset

user feature, Global Instagrammers, Iran, Spain, United States,

Global Instagrammers: From Tehran to San Sebastián, New York and Beyond

Through Instagram, it’s possible to visit every corner of the world. In our Global Instagrammers series, we travel the world by asking people to share their favorite Instagrammers from another country.

Neda Monem (@nedamonem) – Tehran, Iran

"I love that people have the chance to notice the beauties around them that often tend to go unnoticed," says Neda Monem (@nedamonem), an English teacher and musician living in Tehran, Iran. “Over time Instagram has inspired me to better my photographic vision and to document more of what I experience in life.”

Neda says she also loves “that you can experience the world through the eyes of real people.” This includes her own images, which she feels offer a more nuanced look at life in a place many have never visited.

Neda’s favorite Instagrammer outside Iran is Spanish food photographer Aiala Hernando (@aialahernando). “I like following people with a unique style,” she explains, “especially if their feeds make me hungry.”

Aiala Hernando (@aialahernando) – San Sebastián, Spain

Aiala is a food stylist and photographer in San Sebastián, Spain, whose work takes her all across the world. “Instagram started as a hobby for me, and it has become one of the most powerful ways of connecting with amazing people, both personally and professionally,” she says.

Aiala recommends April Flores (@aprilflores). “April makes me feel emotions with her photos. I feel like each of her pictures has a beautiful story behind it.”

April German Flores (@aprilflores) – Brooklyn, New York

"In college I studied chemistry and I dream of someday becoming a botanist in Costa Rica or somewhere with an ocean and big beautiful mountains," says April, a Brooklyn-based prop stylist and founder of home goods collection Native Kind (@native_kind).

April offered documentary photographer Brian Nyongesa (@briannyongesa) as her favorite Instagrammer abroad. “When I look at his photos I feel as if I was there experiencing those moments as well. He captures people in their natural essence so beautifully.”

Photoset

las fallas, current events, spain, valencia, ayjoselito,

Firecrackers and Giant Monuments for Valencia’s Las Fallas Festival

To view more photos and videos from Las Fallas, explore the Plaça de l’Ajuntament and Plaza del Ayuntamiento location pages and browse the #fallas, #lasfallas and #valenciagram_fallas2014 hashtags.

Each year, the city of Valencia, Spain, celebrates the beginning of spring with one of its biggest festivals: Las Fallas. Throughout March every day at 2:00PM the mascletà takes place where firecrackers are set off in Plaça de l’Ajuntament. Tapas, drinks and fiestas throughout the city follow into the evening.

The Las Fallas festival originated as the burning of parots—overhanging structures used to give light that were no longer needed as the days grew longer in springtime. The festival is also tied to the Patron Saint of carpenters, Saint Joseph and many people would burn old furniture in the street. Nowadays, neighborhoods decorate their streets with lights and create their fallas—giant handmade polystyrene figures from popular culture that are paraded on floats down the city’s streets from March 15-19. Often grotesque and satirical, these artistic monuments take months to create and later become huge bonfires across the city. Awards are presented for the best falla, as well as for the best street lights, and the festival culminates in an impressive firework display called Nit del Foc, or “Night of Fire,” that attracts visiting and local Instagrammers alike.

"The spring light changes every single corner of the city. These are the days to walk the streets, to go out and see the monuments, the light decorations, days to hang out with friends, to go to the mascletà everyday in the city center, to watch the fireworks at night by the river Turia at Paseo de la Alameda,” says Valencia Instagrammer Jose (@ayjoselitoo).

"Thousands of tourists visit Valencia in these magical days. Valencia welcomes spring and every single tourist and local with its shiny sun, its lovely blue sky and the smell of azahar flowers (orange blossoms) in the streets.”