Instagram

Get the free app for iOS, Android, or Windows Phone

Welcome to the Instagram blog! See how Instagrammers are capturing and sharing the world's moments through photo and video features, user spotlights, tips and news from Instagram HQ.

Photoset

nature, new zealand, Location Feature, Instagram, landscape, waiotapu,

Exploring New Zealand’s Wai-O-Tapu Geothermal Wonderland

To see more photos and videos from the reserve, browse the #waiotapu hashtag and explore the Waiotapu Thermal Springs Wonderland location page.

On New Zealand’s North Island, an active geothermic reserve houses hot springs of multiple colors and extraordinary volcanic formations. The reserve’s name, Wai-O-Tapu, or “sacred waters,” comes from the indigenous Māori language and alludes to the area’s unique geologic offerings. Wai-O-Tapu Thermal Wonderland is a tourist center within the reserve that provides visitors with a taste of the distinctive geologic attractions. Some of the popular landmarks include colorful pools of water created from mixtures of minerals and bubbling carbon dioxide, erupting mud pools and a geyser that shoots out boiling water every morning. The conservation area was formerly the largest mud volcano in the country until its crown eroded in the early 90s, leaving the steaming springs and fizzling silts that continue to attract local and visiting Instagrammers alike.

Photoset

design, Architecture, Location Feature, Free Spirit Spheres, instagram,

A Stay Among the Treetops in the Free Spirit Spheres

To see more photos from these unique tree houses, explore the Free Spirit Spheres location page.

Suspended among the lush trees of Vancouver Island’s rainforest are some of the world’s most unique hotel accommodations. The Free Spirit Spheres are a family of perfectly round wood and fiberglass tree houses that grant visitors a bird’s-eye view of their picturesque surroundings.

The floating pods, whose design and construction draw heavily from that of sailboats, have interiors as visually striking as their alien exteriors. Each sphere is carefully balanced between three trees and is accessible only by a rope staircase and bridge.

Photoset

Architecture, landscape, location feature, namibia, Kolmanskop,

Exploring Kolmanskop, a Ghost Town in the Namib Desert

To view more photos and videos from the ghost town in the Namib desert, browse the Kolmanskop location page.

Since its abandonment in 1954, the once-booming mining town of Kolmanskop has gradually succumbed to the sands of the Namib Desert. The small town near the coast of Namibia was built in the style of a German village following the discovery of diamonds in 1908, and at its height Kolmanskop boasted a hospital, casino and theater.

Today, the town’s decayed European architecture stands in stark contrast to its sandy surroundings, making it a picturesque destination for adventurous Instagrammers.

Photoset

Location Feature, vietnam, paradise cave,

Exploring Vietnam’s Paradise Cave (Động Thiên Đường)

For more photos and videos from Paradise Cave, browse the #ParadiseCave hashtag and explore the Động Thiên Đường (Paradise Cave) location page.

500km (310 miles) south of Hanoi in Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park, a small portion of a beautiful cave opened in 2011 and now attracts local and visiting Instagrammers to capture what’s inside. Paradise Cave (Động Thiên Đường) is part of cave system that extends for 31km (19 miles), making it one of the longest dry caves in the world. Though originally discovered by a local in 2005, the cave was later explored in full by the British Cave Research Association. The explorers also gave the cave its name after being impressed by the extraordinary limestone formations with towering stalactites and stalagmites that they found inside.

Photoset

ruin bar, budapest, Location Feature, hungary,

Redefining Ruin in Budapest

To view more photos and videos from Budapest’s ruin pubs, browse the #Ruinpub hashtag.

Budapest’s seventh district was left war-torn and abandoned during World War II. Today, these semi-destroyed walls in the city’s Jewish quarter are bursting with activity, creativity and community in romkocsmák, or ruin pubs.

The pub Szimpla Kert opened in 2004 and pioneered a trend that has been sweeping the city for more than a decade: turning old, unused spaces into vibrant places for community to come together. Most ruin pubs are filled with mismatched and repurposed furniture, funky art installations and a lot of style. At Szimpla Kert, for example, tourists and locals alike can enjoy afternoon drinks from the seat of a stripped-down Communist-era car in an open-air garden or visit an art exhibition in this factory-turned-apartment-complex-turned-bar. At night, local DJs transform the space, blasting soundtracks through winding dance rooms.

Ruin pubs inconspicuously take the place of abandoned rooftops, apartment building and car parks, and offer concerts, theater performances, film screenings, art exhibits and community workshops—far more than local Hungarian food and drink.

Photoset

Location Feature, Japan,

Exploring Tomioka Silk Mill (富岡製糸場) in Gunma, Japan

For more photos and videos from the silk mill, browse the #富岡製糸場 hashtag and explore the 富岡製糸場 location page.

Located in Tomioka City, 110km (68 miles) northwest of Tokyo, the Tomioka Silk Mill (富岡製糸場) is one of Japan’s oldest industrial facilities. Since its founding in 1872, the mill produced some of the finest silks in the world for over a century until it ceased its operation in 1987. The mill is a government-appointed historical site open to the public, and was nominated to become a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site in April.

The silk mill was once a major modernizing force as Japan began trade with the Western countries. The Japanese government commissioned French designers, engineers and instructors to staff the mill, and the facility was filled with equipment from France as well. Women across Japan were also recruited to work at the mill under fixed working hours with food and medical benefits—a highly advanced labor environment for the time.

Even after 140 years, the entire facility including the silk reeling factory, cocoon warehouses and workers’ dormitories are well preserved, adding a historical and aesthetic value to the site that attracts both local and visiting Instagrammers alike.

Photoset

Location Feature, peter iredale, shipwreck, oregon,

Exploring the Remains of the Peter Iredale Shipwreck

For more photos and videos from the shipwreck, explore the Peter Iredale Shipwreck location page.

Along the coast of Oregon, the iron skeleton of a 100-year old shipwreck attracts local and visiting Instagrammers to explore its remains.

In 1906, a sudden storm drove the Peter Iredale shipping vessel aground near Fort Stevens, Oregon, as it made its way along the Pacific coast. The ship measured 87 meters (285 feet) in length and boasted four masts and steel plating along its iron frame. Though three of its masts snapped upon impact, the crew suffered no fatalities.

The remains of the ship have stood as a popular tourist attraction ever since the wreck, though much of the remnants have eroded or have been sold for scrap over the last century. Today, only the iron hull still stands, a reminder of times past mired in the sands.

Photoset

Location Feature, chapada diamantina, brazil, vale do pati,

Hiking into Brazil’s Vale do Pati

For more photos and videos from Vale do Pati, explore the Chapada Diamantina location page and browse the #valedopati hashtag.

Vale do Pati, a remote valley tucked away in Brazil’s Chapada Diamantina National Park, draws visitors from all over the world to view its natural sights. Located about 400 kilometers (248 miles) inland from Salvador, the capital city of Bahia, the park and its valley provide escape from the busy city and an alternative to Bahia’s usual beach getaways. From the many waterfalls and rivers to the abundant tropical vegetation and steep surroundings, Vale do Pati is an explorer’s paradise. As Rio de Janeiro Instagrammer Thássio Ferreira (@thassiof) recalls, “It was spectacular to see a huge wall with water running down it in all sorts of shapes: spirals, small drops and even rainbows.”

As a nature reserve, the valley has an estimated population of fewer than 100 people. Since motorized vehicles are forbidden in the valley, locals growing crops such as mandioca depend on mules for transporting any material resources. Travelers wanting to see the land’s abundant beauty can only reach the valley by foot or by mule, and the trip stretches for roughly 22 km (13.67 miles) under Bahia’s beating sun. Visitors then have the option of camping in the valley or staying with local families in very simple lodging where electricity and hot water are reserved for communal areas. Those staying with local families have been known to enjoy their warm spirit and homegrown food—a perfect ending to days of physical activity.

Photoset

Local Lens, Istanbul, Turkey, Location Feature, User Feature,

Local Lens: Capturing Istanbul’s Colorful Streets and History with @sezgiolgac

In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. For more vivid moments from Istanbul, follow @sezgiolgac.

"I owe a lot to the inspiring streets of Istanbul,” says jazz singer and writer Sezgi Olgaç (@sezgiolgac), who has called Turkey’s largest city her home for the last 17 years. “Living in such a multi-layered city fills my soul with the passion and the creative spirits I need every day.”

Rich with Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman history, the ancient and photogenic city straddles the mighty Bosphorus straight, meaning half of Istanbul stands in Europe and the other half in Asia.

Karaköy is where you can take a walk by the Golden Horn, gazing at the iconic silhouettes of the Blue Mosque, Hagia Sophia and New Mosque,” says Sezgi. “Walking across the Galata Bridge is sheer joy for an Instagrammer with its fishermen, ferries and seagulls.” On the other side of the straight sits Kadıköy, “which offers the best views of the Marmara Sea” and is home to the majestic Haydarpaşa Garı railway station.

For the seeker of narrow cobblestone alleys, Segzi suggests Beyoğlu. “Packed with music, bookstores, museums, cafés and a nostalgic tram, Beyoğlu is full of precious moments to capture.” Within walking distance sits Galata, an area steeped in history and home to the 600-year-old Galata Tower that, at 66.9 meters (219 feet), offers spectacular views for miles in every direction.

Photoset

art thursday, Location Feature, spain, sevilla, metropol parasol,

Finding Shade Under Sevilla’s Metropol Parasol

To view more photos of the Metropol Parsol, explore the Metropol Parasol location page and browse the #metropolparasol hashtag.

The Metropol Parasol provides a modern aesthetic against the medieval backdrop of Sevilla, Spain’s old quarter. Arguably the world’s largest wooden structure, it towers 28.5 meters (93.5 feet) over La Plaza de la Encarnación. Inside, one can visit a farmer’s market, archaeological museum, bars, restaurants and an elevated plaza providing beautiful panoramic views of the city. Most importantly, the stunning structure of interlaced panels (supported by concrete and steel) provides the people in the sweltering capitol of Andalucía with a precious resource: 5,000 square meters (53,819 square feet) of shade.

Completed in 2011, no two parts of the Metropol Parasol are the same. It stirs conversation among residents and tourists alike, and is described differently by nearly every person who sees it. Whether one compares German architect Jürgen Mayer-Hermann’s intricate design to waffles or mushrooms (one popular local nickname for the structure is Las Setas de la Encarnación or “The mushrooms of La Plaza de la Encarnción”) many appreciate the six connected parasols that replaced what was previously a car park.

Another fun fact? The structure in the center of hot and sticky Andalucía also claims an additional record—as the world’s largest structure held together by glue.