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Welcome to the Instagram blog! See how Instagrammers are capturing and sharing the world's moments through photo and video features, user spotlights, tips and news from Instagram HQ.

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photography, art, narni, landscape, italy, umbria, Location Feature, instagram, narnia, cs lewis, chronicles of narnia,

A World of Childhood Fantasy in Narni, Italy

For more enchanting photos and videos from Narni, Italy, explore the Narni location page and browse the #Narni hashtag.

There are stunning similarities between the real-life town of Narni and the fictional world of Narnia: blazing green hills, clear blue skies and picturesque stone structures.

In fact, the classic fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia, written by C.S. Lewis in 1950, is rumored to have been inspired by this small Italian town 50 miles north of Rome. According to biographer Walter Hooper, Lewis was fascinated by ancient history, and Narni—named “Narnia” in Roman times—was highlighted by the children’s author in his personal atlas.

Whether Lewis visited Narni has never been confirmed, but even today, its cobblestone streets and castle fortress look like they belong in a magical, medieval novel. And while there are no mythical, talking creatures roaming the land, Narni still feels like a place pulled straight out of our childhood imaginations.

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Photography, travel, Photojournalism, documentary, chiara goia, india, Mongolia, user feature, Instagram, Italy,

At Home in Remote Places with Documentary Photographer @chiaragoia

To see photos from Chiara’s curious journey, follow @chiaragoia on Instagram.

“Where is home? This is the most difficult question you can ask me right now.”

Documentary photographer Chiara Goia (@chiaragoia) uses Instagram as a notebook of her journeys, adding entries from sites as varied as Mediterranean seas, frozen Mongolian lakes and holy sites in India. Ascetics, nomads, fellow travelers and family members alike appear in her stream of images from a life in motion.

Though she has come to feel like “less of a stranger in remote places” than in her native Italy, Chiara describes her path as a photographer as a dream come true. As she explains, “you have to succumb to your own curiosity and let it lead you.”

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Instagram, color, User Feature, Italy, old cars, paint, finnanofenno, photography,

Coloring in Context with @finnanofenno

For more photos and videos of Carlo’s colorful cars, follow @finnanofenno on Instagram

"I want to let people think about social problems in a colorful and funny way," says Instagrammer Carlo Giardina (@finnanofenno), a student and freelance photographer living in Milan whose Instagram photos examine the issue of urban air pollution. He combines images of old cars with colored backgrounds he creates using a paint app on his smartphone, with his finger as the brush and his screen as the canvas. “Each photo has a meaning,” he says. “I’m really attached to them. For the green Volkswagen I just wanted to match the car and the house and tell something about pollution in a funny and maybe grotesque way using simple things like holes, circles and color.”

The wider Instagram community is also participating, sending Carlo their car shots using the #finnycar hashtag. “I’m inspired by the fact that with just one double tap you can meet the world and share your inner world with others.”

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hashtag highlight, notmynonni, Italy, grandparents, photography, portraits, Instagram,

Remembering a Generation with @notmynonni

To view more photos and videos of nonni all over the world, browse the hashtag #notmynonni and follow @notmynonni and @tianapix on Instagram.

Italy Instagrammer Tiana Kai Madera (@tianapix) captioned one of her photos “not my nonna,” using the affectionate word for “grandma” in Italian. When her community was amused by the happy nature of the shot, she started the account @notmynonni (nonni means “grandparents”) to capture quintessential Italian scenes of elderly people going about their daily lives—in the streets, in winter coats, or standing next to old cars. “The older the nonni, the more moved people get—and I hope to capture Italy and all of its nonni,” she explains.

Tiana’s grandfather, to whom the account is dedicated, had Sicilian parents. She says she feels closer to him after moving to Florence from Miami. “I see my grandpa in many nonni that I photograph,” she says. “Some I stop and chat with, others I smile and move on and sometimes assist them if they need help down a step. Each of us has a nonno or nonna inside these strangers.”

Other Instagrammers joined in, using the #notmynonni hashtag to share photos of other people’s grandpas and grandmas.

Tiana feels the love for the account comes from the fact that “everyone has an elderly figure that they love,” and she enjoys seeing people share affectionate photos of nonni all over the world.

"This project reminds us to be kind, to love our family and others."

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carnivale de ivrea, carnival, Italy, current events,

Capturing Carnevale di Ivrea (Battle of the Oranges) on Instagram

To view more photos and videos from Carnevale di Ivrea, explore the Ivrea and Carnevale di Ivrea location page and browse the #carnevaleivrea hashtag on Instagram.

Ivrea, a town in northern Italy, plays host to one of the biggest food fights in Europe every year. Attendees in traditional dress from the middle ages flood the streets and are encouraged to pelt each other with oranges.

The Carnevale di Ivrea (Battle of the Oranges) is the fabled recreation of a medieval battle between townspeople and guards—the origins of which are a mixture of legend and history about driving an evil tyrant out of the city. With horse-drawn carts and helmets, organized teams gather in the town’s square for the battle, leaving only a trail of pulp and peel as evidence of destruction.

Earthquake Devastates Italian Historical Sites

earthquake, italy, current events,

View more photos of the earthquake’s aftermath by searching for the hashtag #terremoto.

A 6.0 magnitude earthquake struck northern Italy early Sunday morning, destroying dozens of historical sites, some as old as 1,000 years. Even 24 hours after the initial quake, aftershocks continued to weaken many of the structures. Italian Instagrammers have been sharing photos of the quake’s aftermath.