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Welcome to the Instagram blog! See how Instagrammers are capturing and sharing the world's moments through photo and video features, user spotlights, tips and news from Instagram HQ.

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Photography, design, Art, Crafts, philippines, leaves, leaf art, User Feature, Instagram,

Creating Leaf Art with @143roy

For more photos and videos of Roy’s leaf art, follow @143roy on Instagram.

“I grew up in a place where most houses have their own mango, guava or other fruit-bearing trees in their backyards,” says Philippines Instagrammer Roy Mallari (@143roy). “We have a mango tree and an avocado tree that I planted myself, and the materials for my leaf art mainly come from this avocado tree.”

Inspired by other Instagrammers like Red Hongyi @redhongyi who create and share their original artwork on Instagram, Roy also began exploring his creativity by taking household objects and arranging them into his drawings and designs. Besides avocado leaves, he likes to use flowers, twigs, stones and and even leftover egg shells from breakfast.

“Leaf art is a result of my wide imagination, where I can create art from the simplest things that often go unnoticed,” explains Roy. “It brings out the real me, as it allows me to pursue what my heart desires the most—which is art.”

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photography, design, art, crafts, sculpture, figurines, Doubleparlour, San Francisco, user feature, instagram,

The Mysterious and Melancholy Resin Figurines of @doubleparlour

To see more of Cassie and Ernie’s figurines come to life, follow @doubleparlour on Instagram.

“We like our characters to look as if they have a past that they may or may not be willing to share,” explains Ernie Velasco. He and his wife Cassie make up the San Francisco, California, artistic duo Doubleparlour (@doubleparlour). Their figurines, which radiate a mysterious sadness, are hand-sculpted from resin.

“We spend a lot of time discussing ideas and bouncing them off of each other,” explains Ernie. The two have a similar aesthetic, however, which aids the creative process. “We both like our characters to display personalities that are melancholy, dark, contemplative or mischievous.”

While Cassie and Ernie endow their creations with rich character, they hold back from illustrating any particular figure’s story. Ernie says, “We like to leave that up to the viewer.”

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Photography, Crafts, interiors, design, Japan, yokohama, wood work, furniture, User Feature, Instagram,

Inside the Woodworker’s Workshop with @mokkouyamagen

For more photos and videos from Genki’s workshop, follow @mokkouyamagen on Instagram.

“The beautiful texture and grain of wood cannot be made by human hands,” says woodworker Genki Nishiyama (@mokkouyamagen) of Yokohama, Japan. Genki, who worked at a furniture factory for nearly 10 years, turned a worn-down warehouse into his own workshop to become an independent furniture maker and delve deeper into the craft.

“Solid wood continues to expand and contract with humidity, even after they are made into furniture,” Genki explains of the challenges he faces. “In a country like Japan where the four seasons bring rapid changes in the atmosphere, you really have to anticipate the arching movements of the wood in order to prevent the furniture from breaking.”

On Instagram, Genki likes to document not only the end products but also the tools and environment inside the workshop. “The heart and artistry of many people go into a product when it’s being made, and I think people will enjoy exploring that creation process.”

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origami, crafts, cape town, art, sculpture, paper, design, user feature, instagram, ross symons,

Finding Beauty in Everyday Origami with @white_onrice

For more images of Ross Symons’ origami creations, follow @white_onrice on Instagram.

"I started with the crane and I lost count of how many times I folded it,” says Cape Town Instagrammer Ross Symons (@white_onrice), describing his obsession with origami art.

“What I didn’t realize at the time is how origami was going to become such a massive part of my life,” he says. “At the beginning of 2014 I decided that I would post one different origami figure every day for the whole year. I did this for myself to prove that I could do it.”

He considers fold time to be the most important measurement of success for his work: the more discipline and patience he has, the faster he folds the figure.

“‘It’s just paper, it shouldn’t take long to make’ is a response I’ve heard before,” Ross says. “I feel there is a misconception that because origami uses paper to create something, that means it’s easy to do.”

On Instagram, Ross connects with a global community that shares his fascination with folding paper. “The people I chat to on Instagram are from all over the world,” he explains. “There is something really rewarding about folding a model and getting it right, no matter how complex or simple. I love—and when I say love I mean I’m totally obsessed with—folding paper.”

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Photography, design, art, crafts, stained glass, interiors, user feature, art thursday, instagram, annahita hessami,

Illuminating the Craft of Stain Glass with @annahitahessami

To see more photos and videos of stained glass creation from Annahita’s studio, follow @annahitahessami on Instagram.

“Stained glass artists today use the same techniques to produce modern works that medieval craftsmen used through history,” explains Annahita Hessami (@annahitahessami), who established her London stained glass studio in 2011. “The techniques of the trade have barely changed at all.”

Recently, Annahita paused production of her more traditional stained glass creations to work on several pieces for Brooklyn artist Beau Stanton (@beaustanton). “Beau found me on Instagram and approached me to make a series of seven panels for an upcoming show called Tenebras Lux.” Debuting within the Crypt of St. John the Baptist in Bristol, UK, before moving to London, the show draws from and repurposes classical and medieval religious iconography.

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Photography, Art, Crafts, sculpture, robots, typewriter, technology, User Feature, In the Artist's Studio, Instagram,

The Art of Typewriter Sculpture with @jeremymayer

To see more photos and videos of Jeremy’s typewriter sculptures, follow @jeremymayer on Instagram.

Inside his studio in Oakland, California, artist Jeremy Mayer (@jeremymayer) transforms typewriters into majestic mythological beings. His most recent completed commission is a sculpture of the Greek titaness Theia that is over 7 feet tall (2.21 meters) and made entirely of components from 40 different typewriters. “I don’t solder, glue, weld or wire the parts together,” says Jeremy. “I use only screws, nuts, pins and springs to assemble the sculpture in the same manner that the typewriter was held together.”

The painstakingly detailed process to create a full-scale human figure requires more than a year of Jeremy’s time. “I spend countless hours trying to figure out how to put this stuff together,” he says. “Doing an accurate likeness of a person hurts my brain. Hurts so good, though. There’s a lot of trial and error. I’m done when it creeps me out, or if I walk into the studio and the sculpture startles me because it looks like someone is standing there.”

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Photography, Art, Crafts, Artists on Tumblr, User Feature, Tokyo, Japan, felt doll, Instagram,

Inside @fujitasanpuru’s Tiny World of Chimchiminey, the Chimney Sweep

For more photos and videos of Chimchiminey and its friends, follow @fujitasanpuru on Instagram.

“The concept of my work is a dreamy, cute world that people might believe could exist somewhere,” says a Tokyo doll maker who goes by the pseudonym Fujita Sanpuru (@fujitasanpuru). Through his photos, he tells the story of the chimney sweep Chimchiminey and his devoted helper Heso-guma (“belly button bear”).

Fujita Sanpuru uses felt and embroidery threads to create these pint-sized figurines, focusing on bringing the right balance of detail and simplicity to the handicraft. He then arranges the characters on table tops, in gardens or in their small and colorful dollhouses to create scenes like the pages from a children’s picture book.

The tiny felted figures actually originated when he first started using Instagram and made a prop for his first photo. Soon after sharing the Chimchiminey series, he began receiving numerous offers to sell and display his work. He reflects on his experience, “I never thought the dolls would take off like this when I started Instagram, but I’m just happy if people find them delightful.”

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weekend hashtag project, WHPthemakingof, hyperlapse, pottery, crafts, makers, video on instagram, Instagram, Photography,

Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPthemakingof

Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes and hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.

The goal this weekend is to roll up your sleeves and capture videos of making things by hand. Some tips to get you started:

  • Use this project as a moment to dust off your skills or try something new. Whether it’s blacksmithing, origami, pottery or cooking, don’t be afraid to be creative, get your hands dirty and—most importantly—have fun!
  • Don’t have a particular craft of your own? Seek out local crafters, bakers, artists and makers. Ask if you can learn about their work and share their craft through your videos.
  • For showing process, think about how to pace your video. In addition to normal speed, you can use slow motion to draw out a single detailed moment or time lapse to fit an entire project into 15 seconds.

PROJECT RULES: Please only add the #WHPthemakingof hashtag to videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own videos to the project. Any tagged video taken over the weekend is eligible to be featured Monday morning.

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photography, music, crafts, oslo, norway, violin, cello, user feature, the making of, instagram,

Bringing Stringed Instruments to Life with @jacobvdlippe

For more moments from Jacob’s workshop, follow @jacobvdlippe on Instagram.

“With a new instrument, the musician can actually shape the sound in the first years, making it an integral part in their way of communicating music,” explains Norwegian violin and cello maker Jacob von der Lippe (@jacobvdlippe). “Instead of doing repairs, I focused on making new right from the start.”

For Jacob, who took up cello at age eight, music has been a lifelong pursuit. “My parents were passionate about music, and encouraged my playing,” he says. At 17, he built his first cello as a school project. “From then on, I was hooked.”

“Being able to work with a craft merged with music was something that really appealed to me,” explains Jacob, who spent five years in Cremona, Italy—the violin’s birthplace—studying the trade. Fourteen years and nearly sixty violins later, Jacob’s creations have found their way into the hands of musicians around the globe.

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photography, art, design, crafts, embroidery, Australia, nature, user feature, Art Thursday, Instagram,

Embroidering Nature’s Patterns with @meredithwoolnough

To see more of Meredith’s nature-inspired creations, follow @meredithwoolnough on Instagram.

“I have been collecting skeletonized leaves for as long as I can remember,” explains Australian artist Meredith Woolnough (@meredithwoolnough), whose elaborate embroideries mimic coral, leaves and other forms from nature. “I have always found inspiration in the natural world.”

Meredith’s particular method of embroidery is well-suited for patterns inspired by nature. “I work with a unique technique that allows me to create embroidered structures that exist without a base cloth. It’s not your typical embroidery.”

A near perfect Scribbly gum leaf Meredith found inspired her largest work to date. “I mapped out the internal structure of the leaf and translated the design into a dense network of stitches,” she says. “It took me months to complete and it almost sent me mad, but I am so happy with how it turned out.”