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Welcome to the Instagram blog! See how Instagrammers are capturing and sharing the world's moments through photo and video features, user spotlights, tips and news from Instagram HQ.

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Architecture, Location Feature, singapore, marina bay sands,

Exploring Singapore’s Sands SkyPark Infinity Pool

For more photos and videos from the infinity pool, explore the Infinity Pool At Marina Bay Sands and Marina Bay Sands location pages.

On the rooftop of the Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore, the luxurious outdoor Sands SkyPark Infinity Pool stretches 150 meters (492 feet) across three hotel towers. A catchment system below the pool keeps the water circulating at the top while complex architecture secures the pool’s deck to the towers that sway subtly with the wind 200 meters (650 feet) above ground. The pool is not only renowned for its unique location and length, but also for the vanishing edge effect, designed by Israeli-Canadian architect Moshe Safdie. The pool is open only to hotel guests, and Instagrammers who stay at the hotel share their exclusive experience of the pool’s visual illusion and spectacular view of the city’s skyline.

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Location Feature, dinosaurs, cabazon, cabazon dinosaurs, Instagram, Architecture,

The Cabazon Dinosaurs: A Surprise in the Desert

For more photos of Dinny and Mr. Rex, explore the Cabazon Dinosaurs location page.

For any adventurous road-tripper making the 157-kilometer (97.5-mile) drive between Los Angeles and Palm Springs, California, there are three surefire signs that you’re on your way: vast expanses of desert, fields of industrial windmills—and dinosaurs.

Dinny the Dinosaur and her companion, Mr. Rex, tower over the horizon of Cabazon, California. The pair were created by sculptor Claude K. Belle as a roadside wonder to attract customers to his Wheel Inn Restaurant located beneath their feet. Belle led the project without the help of external companies, opting instead to work with a few friends to complete his vision.

Dinny, an Apatosaurus, came first in 1981, built from salvaged interstate materials over the course of 11 years. In all, she measures 46 meters (150 feet) in length and stretches 14 meters (45 feet) into the sky. Mr. Rex, who is slightly taller at 20 meters (65 feet) came next in 1986. Made from concrete and steel, both dinosaurs weigh more than 100 tons each.

In addition to their photogenic exteriors, the dinos were designed as hollow structures that visitors can explore. Dinny’s belly contains a gift shop and adventurous Instagrammers can scale Mr. Rex for a shot of the desert horizon through the Tyrannosaurus’s mouth.

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Architecture, churches, ethiopia, Location Feature, Instagram,

Uncovering the Rock Churches of Lalibela in Northern Ethiopia

To view more photos and videos of the rock churches of northern Ethiopia, browse the #Lalibela hashtag and location page.

Nine hundred years ago, workers set out to construct a new holy city in the northern highlands of Ethiopia. Instead of building from the ground up, they began chiseling down into the red volcanic rock. Believed to be built with the assistance of angels working through the night, the 11 rock-hewn churches of Lalibela were carved into giant blocks of sandstone and connected through a series of tunnels, ceremonial passageways, drainage ditches and caves.

Today, Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s most holy cities and carries the nickname of “New Jerusalem.” It has been a pilgrimage site for Christians for centuries and continues to be a destination for worship and daily devotion for the priests, monks and orthodox Christians who comprise the town’s population. Tourists from around the world now also trek to Lalibela to marvel at its stunning architectural accomplishments. Though all of the original churches are still in active use, many of the structures are considered to be in critical condition as a result of water damage and seismic activity. UNESCO declared Lalibela a world-heritage site in 1978 and has organized support to restore the monuments. A number of the churches are now protected under temporary light-weight shelters.

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Architecture, Japan, user feature, Instagram,

Centering in on Architecture with @_f7

To see more photos and videos from Yoshito, follow @_f7 on Instagram.

"My job is to create things, which is probably why I find manmade objects more interesting than things in nature," says Kanagawa Instagrammer Yoshito Hasaka (@_f7). Working as an application designer in a Tokyo-based company, Yoshito is constantly inspired by the cityscape and the constructions of various shapes and sizes that fill the city. On Instagram, he likes to challenge himself to fit as many details from a building as he can into one small square photo. “I am not a professional in architecture or photography, but when I put myself in the shoes of the people who created the space, I can make my own interpretation of where the most appealing point of the scene is intended to be.”

Yoshito likes to keep the building front and center when shooting architecture. He finds a point that cuts straight through a given space and aims to bring the vanishing point to the center while capturing the entire scene. “I naturally find myself shooting from the front of things,” explains Yoshito. “I want to preserve that towering, enclosing impression of buildings, and I think I can best express that by looking at them straight from the front.”

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xu bing, art, Architecture, cathedral, phoenix, sculpture, photography, Instagram, Art Thursday,

Xu Bing’s Phoenix at St. John the Divine

To see more photos from Xu Bing’s Phoenix at The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, explore the St. John the Divine location page and browse the #xubing hashtag.

For the duration of 2014, the artist Xu Bing’s Phoenix—a pair of majestic, glittering sculptures made of refuse and debris—can be viewed at The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine in New York City. “My Phoenix uses the lowliest materials of labor to adorn itself with beauty and self-respect,” Xu says.

Before coming to St. John the Divine, the work has been displayed in venues such as the Today Art Museum in Beijing and the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (@massmoca). Soaring amongst the carved wood and stained glass of the cathedral, the sculptures take on a sacred quality. “It creates a unique visual and spiritual landscape for the public,” Xu says, “a landscape that I believe is capable of transporting us to an entirely new place. The splendor that underlies the phoenixes and the splendor that underlies the cathedral shine off of one another, creating a space of massive tension that moves every one of us.”

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Architecture, roofline_envelope, geof newsum, hashtag highlight, User Feature, Instagram,

Flipping Perspectives with @slowjam98 and #roofline_envelope

For more from Geof’s creative series, browse the #roofline_envelope hashtag and follow @slowjam98 on Instagram.

Phoenix, Arizona, Instagrammer Geof Newsum (@slowjam98) first downloaded Instagram to follow his wife, Ayanah (@ayanah), but after the two attended a local InstaMeet, Geof was inspired by the community to tap more deeply into his creative interests.

While on a lunch break one day, Geof snapped a photo of the roof of a nearby building. “After flipping the photo, it struck me that it looked like an envelope,” he explains. With that, the #roofline_envelope hashtag was born. “I came up with the tag and got stuck on the idea, posting two more that week. I’m now at 41 and counting.”

Since starting the series, Geof has watched it spread throughout the community and continue to pick up steam. As for where he wants to take it next, he says, “I’ve been wanting to create a special series based on endangered historic homes in Phoenix. I love the stories found in local architecture.”

Want to try out taking a #roofline_envelope of your own? Geof has some tips to share:

"Start with a gable wall—a flat wall under a pitched roof. Make sure there aren’t any wires or branches breaking the line of the roof. Take a second to position yourself dead center. When composing the shot, get linear elements from the roofline to perfectly meet the corners of the image." From there, rotate the image 180º and you’re ready to go!

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design, Architecture, Location Feature, Free Spirit Spheres, instagram,

A Stay Among the Treetops in the Free Spirit Spheres

To see more photos from these unique tree houses, explore the Free Spirit Spheres location page.

Suspended among the lush trees of Vancouver Island’s rainforest are some of the world’s most unique hotel accommodations. The Free Spirit Spheres are a family of perfectly round wood and fiberglass tree houses that grant visitors a bird’s-eye view of their picturesque surroundings.

The floating pods, whose design and construction draw heavily from that of sailboats, have interiors as visually striking as their alien exteriors. Each sphere is carefully balanced between three trees and is accessible only by a rope staircase and bridge.

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Architecture, landscape, location feature, namibia, Kolmanskop,

Exploring Kolmanskop, a Ghost Town in the Namib Desert

To view more photos and videos from the ghost town in the Namib desert, browse the Kolmanskop location page.

Since its abandonment in 1954, the once-booming mining town of Kolmanskop has gradually succumbed to the sands of the Namib Desert. The small town near the coast of Namibia was built in the style of a German village following the discovery of diamonds in 1908, and at its height Kolmanskop boasted a hospital, casino and theater.

Today, the town’s decayed European architecture stands in stark contrast to its sandy surroundings, making it a picturesque destination for adventurous Instagrammers.

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User Feature, Architecture, south of france, chateau de gudanes, french architecture, france,

Bringing the Stately @cheateaugudanes Back to Life

For more photos and videos from the restoration of the chateau as it progresses, follow @chateaugudanes on Instagram.

When Australian couple Karina and Craig Waters began the search for a French cottage, they had little idea of the adventure they would ultimately find: restoring the regal Chateau de Gudanes (@chateaugudanes).

As they embarked on their venture in French real estate, the options they turned up were disheartening—so much so that they nearly abandoned the dream. After their son stumbled upon an online listing for a large abandoned chateau in the Pyrénées, however, they ventured back to France.

"We had no idea where the Pyrénées were geographically," Karina explains. "We drove from Paris to Toulouse then headed towards the Midi-Pyrénées. By the time we drove past fields of sunflowers, towards snow capped mountains linking earth to heaven and then entered the little village and saw the chateau tucked gently in a glorious valley, we were speechless. We made an offer a couple of days later."

At long last, they had found Chateau de Gudanes, a stately home and grounds that dated back to the 13th century before being reconstructed by famed French architect Ange-Jacques Gabriel as a lavish home for the Marquis Louis Gaspard de Sales.

The dilapidated chateau required substantial work after years of disuse—an undertaking Karina and her family have embraced wholeheartedly. With nearly 100 rooms including a central chapel and a newly discovered underground chamber beneath the basement, the challenges of structural renovation form a constant process around which Karina has developed an eager community on Instagram. “I make a coffee, post a photo and then hours later from the other side of the world, I receive a comment from someone saying, ‘This is the best part of my day, making a coffee and seeing what the photo is for today.’ I love being here onsite, sharing what I love, experiencing it and knowing that someone else feels the same way.”

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location feature, cathedral park, st johns bridge, portland, Architecture,

Exploring Portland’s Cathedral Park

For more photos and videos from the park and its arches, explore the Cathedral Park and St. John’s Bridge location pages.

In the northernmost part of Portland, Oregon, the iconic St. John’s Bridge extends across the Willamette River. Though the bridge has become known for its green hue and distinctly pointed towers, the park underneath has also come to enjoy a fame of its own.

The bridge’s stylized architecture continues even into its soaring concrete supports, which resemble the arches of a Gothic cathedral. Taking its name from the supports, Cathedral Park opened in 1980—a stark change from what had nearly been a junkyard beneath the bridge a decade earlier.

Now, the park’s lush meadow spaces, proximity to the river and dramatic backdrops create a special draw for local and visiting Instagrammers, making the space a favorite for creative outings and InstaMeets.