The Making Of: Bookbinding with @pegandawl

For more from Margaux’s life and works, follow @pegandawl on Instagram.

For Philadelphia artisan Margaux Kent (@pegandawl), her love of bookbinding—and of Instagram—has its roots in journaling. Having made books since she was a child (“The first book that I made was called Circis Acters for Mommy. I must have been 6.”), she took up the craft in earnest after taking it upon herself to repair a beautiful book that had fallen apart.

Once preferring to build large-scale books, she turned to her signature miniature style as a matter of efficiency. “I use only antique and vintage leather to cover my books, so naturally, I had lots of gorgeous scrap,” Margaux explains. “I made a few miniatures to draw attention to my other journals one year at Renegade Craft Fair and they ended up selling first. I got into minis from there.”

Together with her husband, Walter, and a team of a few others, Margaux crafts for Peg and Awl, a small business creating products out of “treasures found and recovered from misfortune and neglect.” Her books and other handiworks—photographs, jewelry, writings and more—populate her Instagram account, which she sees as a new extension of her past journaling habits.

"When I used to write all of the time, I would write to my imaginary children and grandchildren of the future. I always had to have a someone out there who was reading," she says. "Instagram has become the voice that once belonged to the pages in my book. ‘Fill me! Identify something worth identifying!’"